APPENDIX 2: Crop Sequence Problems and Opportun...

APPENDIX 2: Crop Sequence Problems and Opportunities

APPENDIX 2: Crop Sequence Problems and Opportunities

Compiled by Charles L. Mohler

All numbers in parentheses are references, and can be found here.

How to read this chart: Find the preceding crop in the third column and the following crop in the fifth row. Columns for row number, family and preceding crop are repeated across the chart for easier use. Using the row number and column letter, locate the detailed note about a crop sequence in the notes section that follows this chart. A 20-page PDF of this appendix as it appears in the book is also available.

Key to Cell Data
A blank cell indicates that the sequence has no known advantages or disadvantages. Follow general rotation guidelines described in this book.
XXXX =  Crops are the same; do not plant. I = Insect problems. S   =  Soil structural problems.
D  =  Disease problems. I-  = Decreases insect problems. S-  =  Decreases soil structural problems.
D- = Decreases disease problems. N  = Crop nutrition problems. C   =  Crop management problems.
W = Weed problems. N- =  Decreases crop nutrition problems. C- =  Decreases crop management problems.
W- = Decreases weed problems.    
  A B C D E F G H I   J K L M N O P Q R S T U V   W X Y Z AA AB AC AD AE   AF AG AH AI AJ AK AL AM AN AO AP AQ AR   AS AT AU AV AW AX AY AZ
FAMILY FAMILY FAMILY                 FAMILY FAMILY
Lily Lily Lily Lily Legume Legume Lettuce Nightshade   Nightshade Nightshade Nightshade Carrot Carrot Carrot Mustard Mustard Mustard Mustard Mustard Mustard Cucurbit Cucurbit Cucurbit Cucurbit Beet Beet Grass Rose Grass Grass   Grass Grass Grass Legume Legume Legume Grass- legume Grass Grass Grass Grass Buckwheat Legume Legume Legume Legume Legume Legume Legume Mustard Mustard
 
FOLLOWING CROP FOLLOWING CROP FOLLOWING CROP                 FOLLOWING CROP FOLLOWING CROP
    PRECEDING CROP General Onion Scallion Leek Garlic Bean, snap Pea Lettuce, etc.1 Potato ROW NO. Tomato Eggplant Pepper Carrot, parsnip Celery, herbs etc.2 Celeriac Crucifer greens3 Broccoli, cauliflower Cabbage, brussels sprouts4 Kale, collards Radish Turnip, rutabaga, daikon Cucumber     PRECEDING CROP Melons5 Pumpkin, w. squash Summer squash Spinach, chard Beet Sweet corn Strawberry Field corn Oat
ROW NO.
 
Spring barley Winter wheat, spelt Rye Soybean Dry bean Alfalfa Grass-legume hay Winter grain, cc6 Spring grain, cc7 Annual ryegrass Sorghum- sudangrass Buckwheat White clover     PRECEDING CROP Clovers, hardy8 Clovers, not hardy9 Sweet clover Hairy vetch Field pea Bell bean Rape, canola Oilseed radish
ROW NO. FAMILY ROW NO. FAMILY ROW NO. FAMILY
1 General   W-             W- 1                           1 General                   1                           1 General                
2 Lily Onion C XXXX   D D         2                           2 Lily Onion                   2                           2 Lily Onion                
3 Lily Scallion C   XXXX             3                           3 Lily Scallion                   3                           3 Lily Scallion                
4 Lily Leek C D   XXXX D, S       S 4       S               S   4 Lily Leek                   4                           4 Lily Leek                
5 Lily Garlic C D   D, S XXXX       S, S-, N- 5       S               S   5 Lily Garlic                   5                           5 Lily Garlic                
6 Legume Bean, snap           XXXX   D D 6               D- D- D- D- D-   6 Legume Bean, snap                   6       D D                 6 Legume Bean, snap         D D    
7 Legume Pea             XXXX D, C-   7             C-       C-     7 Legume Pea       C-           7                           7 Legume Pea D       D D    
8 Lettuce Lettuce etc.1   W-   W-   D D XXXX D 8 D, C- C- C- W-                 C- 8 Lettuce Lettuce etc.1 C- C- C-             8                           8 Lettuce Lettuce etc.1 D       D D    
9 Nightshade Potato W-     S S, C- D   D XXXX 9 D, I D, I   D, S, W- D, S- D S-         S   9 Nightshade Potato         D   D     9                           9 Nightshade Potato                
10 Nightshade Tomato           D   D D, I 10 XXXX D, I D         D- D- D- D- D- D 10 Nightshade Tomato D D D       D     10                           10 Nightshade Tomato                
11 Nightshade Eggplant                 D, I 11 D, I XXXX D                   D 11 Nightshade Eggplant D D D             11                           11 Nightshade Eggplant                
12 Nightshade Pepper                 D 12 D D XXXX                   D 12 Nightshade Pepper D D D             12                           12 Nightshade Pepper                
13 Carrot Carrot, parsnip   W   S S D   D D, S 13       XXXX D D           S D 13 Carrot Carrot, parsnip                   13                 W-, S-         13 Carrot Carrot, parsnip         W-, N-      
14 Carrot Celery, herbs etc.2                 D 14       D XXXX D               14 Carrot Celery, herbs etc.2                   14                           14 Carrot Celery, herbs etc.2                
15 Carrot Celeriac                 D 15       D D XXXX               15 Carrot Celeriac                   15                           15 Carrot Celeriac                
16 Mustard Crucifer greens3                   16 D, C- C- C-       XXXX D D D D D N-, C- 16 Mustard Crucifer greens3 N-, C- N-, C- N-, C-             16                           16 Mustard Crucifer greens3             D D
17 Mustard Broccoli, cauliflower           D   D D 17             D XXXX D D D D N- 17 Mustard Broccoli, cauliflower N- N- N-, C-       D-     17                           17 Mustard Broccoli, cauliflower             D D
18 Mustard Cabbage, b. sprouts4           D D- D D 18 D           D D XXXX D D D N- 18 Mustard Cabbage, b. sprouts4 N- N- N-   D         18                           18 Mustard Cabbage, b. sprouts4             D D
19 Mustard Kale, collards           D D- D D 19             D D D XXXX D D N- 19 Mustard Kale, collards N- N- N-             19                           19 Mustard Kale, collards             D D
20 Mustard Radish             D-   D 20             D D D D XXXX D N- 20 Mustard Radish N- N- N-             20                           20 Mustard Radish             D D
21 Mustard Turnip, rutabaga, daikon             D-   D 21             D D D D D XXXX D, N- 21 Mustard Turnip, rutabaga, daikon N- N- N-             21                           21 Mustard Turnip, rutabaga, daikon             D D
22 Cucurbit Cucumber W-         W-   W   22   D D W     W, N- D-, N- D-, N- D-, N- D- D- XXXX 22 Cucurbit Cucumber D D D     I   I   22         W-                 22 Cucurbit Cucumber                
23 Cucurbit Melons5 W-         W-   W   23   D D W     W, N- N- N- N-     D 23 Cucurbit Melons5 XXXX D D     I   I   23         W-                 23 Cucurbit Melons5                
24 Cucurbit Pumpkin, winter squash W-         W-   W   24   D D W     W, N- N- N- N-     D 24 Cucurbit Pumpkin, winter squash D XXXX D     I   I   24         W-                 24 Cucurbit Pumpkin, winter squash       C-        
25 Cucurbit Summer squash W-             W   25   D D W     W, N- N- N- N-     D 25 Cucurbit Summer squash D D XXXX     I   I   25                           25 Cucurbit Summer squash                
26 Beet Spinach, chard   W-   W-       C-   26       W-             C-     26 Beet Spinach, chard       XXXX           26                           26 Beet Spinach, chard                
27 Beet Beet                 D 27               D D D       27 Beet Beet         XXXX         27                           27 Beet Beet                
28 Grass Sweet corn           D-     C- 28               D- D- D-       28 Grass Sweet corn   D     D- XXXX   I D 28   D     D-                 28 Grass Sweet corn                
29 Rose Strawberry                 D 29 D D                       29 Rose Strawberry             XXXX     29                           29 Rose Strawberry                
30 Grass Field corn           D-     C- 30               D- D- D-       30 Grass Field corn   D     D- I   XXXX D 30 D D, D-     D-                 30 Grass Field corn                
31 Grass Oat D-, W W, I W, I W, I   D-   D- D-, I 31       W, I W     D- D- D-     I 31 Grass Oat I       D-, I I   I XXXX 31   D, D-, I I   D-                 31 Grass Oat                
32 Grass Spring barley D-, W W, I W, I W, I   D- D- D- D-, I 32       W, I W     D- D- D-     I 32 Grass Spring barley I       D-, I I   I   32 XXXX D, I D, I   D-                 32 Grass Spring barley                
33 Grass Winter wheat, spelt D- W, I W, I W, I   D-   D- D-, I 33       W, I W     D- D- D-     I 33 Grass Winter wheat, spelt I       D-, I I   D, I I 33 D XXXX D, I   D-                 33 Grass Winter wheat, spelt                
34 Grass Rye D- W, I W, I W, I   D-   D- D-, I 34       W, I W     D- D- D-     I 34 Grass Rye I       D-, I I   I I 34     XXXX   D-   D             34 Grass Rye                
35 Legume Soybean           D     D- 35                           35 Legume Soybean               D-   35       XXXX D                 35 Legume Soybean             D  
36 Legume Dry bean           D   D D 36                           36 Legume Dry bean                   36   D-   D XXXX                 36 Legume Dry bean         D D    
37 Legume Alfalfa hay                 D- 37       D                   37 Legume Alfalfa hay                   37         N-, S- XXXX               37 Legume Alfalfa hay         D D    
38 Grass-legume Grass & grass-leg. hay   I I I         D- 38       W, I                 I 38 Grass-legume Grass & grass-leg. hay I       I D-, I, N- I D-, I, N- D, I 38   D, I D, I   N-, S-   XXXX C-           38 Grass-legume Grass & grass-leg. hay       C-        
39 Grass Winter grain, cc6 W-, I-, N, S, C, C- I I I   D- D- C D- 39       C C   C D- D- D-       39 Grass Winter grain, cc6         D-         39 D       D-     XXXX           39 Grass Winter grain, cc6                
40 Grass Spring grain, cc7 D-, I-, N, S, C- I I I   D-     D- 40               D-, W-, S- D-, W-, S- D-, W-, S-       40 Grass Spring grain, cc7         D-         40         D-       XXXX         40 Grass Spring grain, cc7                
41 Grass Annual ryegrass N, S I I I         D- 41             D- D- D- D- D- D-   41 Grass Annual ryegrass                   41                   XXXX       41 Grass Annual ryegrass                
42 Grass Sorghum-sudangrass D- I I I         D- 42                           42 Grass Sorghum-sudangrass                   42                     XXXX     42 Grass Sorghum-sudangrass                
43 Buckwheat Buckwheat                 D-, S- 43               D- D- D- D- D-   43 Buckwheat Buckwheat                   43                       XXXX   43 Buckwheat Buckwheat                
44 Legume White clover I, N-             I   44                           44 Legume White clover                   44                         XXXX 44 Legume White clover                
45 Legume Clovers, hardy8 I, N-           D D, I   45             C- C-   C-       45 Legume Clovers, hardy8                   45       D D                 45 Legume Clovers, hardy8 XXXX       D D    
46 Legume Clovers, not hardy9 N-             I   46                           46 Legume Clovers, not hardy9                   46                           46 Legume Clovers, not hardy9   XXXX            
47 Legume Sweet clover N-         D     D 47                           47 Legume Sweet clover                   47       D       C-           47 Legume Sweet clover D   XXXX     D    
48 Legume Hairy vetch D, N-, C-           D     48                         N- 48 Legume Hairy vetch D-, N- N- N-             48               W           48 Legume Hairy vetch       XXXX        
49 Legume Field pea N-, C-           D D   49               N-, W- N-, W- N-, W-       49 Legume Field pea                   49                           49 Legume Field pea D       XXXX D    
50 Legume Bell bean N-           D D   50             N- N- N- N- N- N-   50 Legume Bell bean                   50                           50 Legume Bell bean D       D XXXX    
51 Mustard Rape, canola D-               D- 51             D D D D D D   51 Mustard Rape, canola                   51                           51 Mustard Rape, canola             XXXX D
52 Mustard Oilseed radish D-               D- 52             D D D D D D   52 Mustard Oilseed radish                   52       D-                   52 Mustard Oilseed radish             D XXXX
                                                                                                                             

Notes:

1  Includes lettuce, chicory, endive, and escarole.

2  Includes celery, fennel, parsley, dill, and related herbs.

3 Includes mustard greens, Asian greens, napa cabbage, arugula, and cress.

4 Includes cabbage, Brussels sprouts, and kohlrabi.

5 Includes cantaloupe and watermelon.

6 Includes winter wheat, spelt, and rye.

7 Includes barley, oat, and spring wheat.

8 Includes red clover, alsike clover, and crimson clover in the south.

9 Includes berseem clover and crimson clover in the north.

Notes on Interactions:
Row Col. Notes
1 B W-, weed control in onion, which is a weak competitor, is easier following the good weed suppression that results when a competitive crop like tomato or squash is heavily mulched with hay (80).
1 I W-, due to cultivation, hilling, and digging, potato is useful for cleaning up after a weedy crop (83).
2 A C, many crops do well after alliums, possibly due to mycorrhizal buildup (82, 83).
2 B XXXX
2 D D, white rot, onion smut (danger is primarily to seedlings before transplanting) (36).
2 E D, white rot (36).
3 A C, many crops do well after alliums, possibly due to mycorrhizal buildup (82, 83).
3 C XXXX
4 A C, many crops do well after alliums, possibly due to mycorrhizal buildup (82, 83).
4 B D, onion smut (danger is primarily to seedlings before transplanting), white rot (36).
4 D XXXX
4 E D, white rot (36).S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80).
4 I S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80).
4 M S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80).
4 U S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80).
5 A C, many crops do well after Alliums, possibly due to mycorrhizal buildup (82, 83).
5 B D, white rot (36).
5 D D, white rot (36).S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80).
5 E XXXX
5 I S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80). S-, N-, mulched garlic, however, tends to restore soil structure and fertility after the relatively extractive potato crop (80).
5 M S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80).
5 U S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80).
6 F XXXX
6 H D, sclerotinia drop (67; see appendix 3).
6 I D, sclerotinia stalk rot (67; see appendix 3).
6 Q D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
6 R D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
6 S D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
6 T D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
6 U D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
6 AI D, common bacterial blight (Xanthomonas campestris; appendix 3); soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) increases to high density on bean, though the bean crop is scarcely affected (28, 41).
6 AJ D, common bacterial blight (Xanthomonas campestris; appendix 3); soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) (28).
6 AW D, field pea and bell bean should not be planted after bean due to FusariumPythium, and Sclerotinia (119).
6 AX D, field pea and bell bean should not be planted after bean due to FusariumPythium, and Sclerotinia (119).
7 G XXXX
7 H D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36). C-, there is time for a short-season crop after harvesting pea, and the second crop benefits from N supplied by the pea (81).
7 P C-, there is time for a crop of crucifer greens or spinach after harvesting pea, and the second crop benefits from N supplied by the pea (81).
7 T C-, timing works well to plant lettuce or radish after pea or spinach within a year (82).
7 Z C-, there is time for a crop of crucifer greens or spinach after harvesting pea, and the second crop benefits from N supplied by the pea (81).
7 AS D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
7 AW D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
7 AX D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
8 B W-, a short-season crop like lettuce or spinach allows good weed control and low weed seed production prior to slow-growing, long-season, hard-to-weed crops like onion and carrot (83).
8 D W-, a short-season crop like lettuce or spinach allows good weed control and low weed seed production prior to slow-growing, long-season, hard-to-weed crops like onion and carrot (83).
8 F D, sclerotinia white mold (67; see appendix 3).
8 G D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
8 H XXXX
8 I D, sclerotinia stalk rot (67; see appendix 3).
8 J D, lettuce, cabbage, and cress can be symptomless carriers of Colletotrichum coccodes, which causes tomato anthracnose and black dot. C-, short-season salad greens act as a cover crop and are harvested in time to plant tomato, eggplant, or pepper (83).
8 K C-, short-season salad greens act as a cover crop and are harvested in time to plant tomato, eggplant, or pepper (83).
8 L C-, short-season salad greens act as a cover crop and are harvested in time to plant tomato, eggplant, or pepper (83).
8 M W-, a short-season crop like lettuce or spinach allows good weed control and low weed seed production prior to slow-growing, long-season, hard-to-weed crops like onion and carrot (83).
8 V C-, leafy greens can make a crop before cucurbits need to be planted, and residue from the greens act as a green manure (81).
8 W C-, leafy greens can make a crop before cucurbits need to be planted, and residue from the greens act as a green manure (81).
8 X C-, leafy greens can make a crop before cucurbits need to be planted, and residue from the greens act as a green manure (81).
8 Y C-, leafy greens can make a crop before cucurbits need to be planted, and residue from the greens act as a green manure (81).
8 AS D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
8 AW D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
8 AX D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
9 A W-, due to cultivation, hilling, and digging, potatoes are useful for cleaning up weeds prior to other crops (83, 81).
9 D S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, preceding and following root crops with “soil building” crops is often desirable (80).
9 E S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80). C-, the timing of potato harvest and garlic planting are well suited for following potato with garlic (83).
9 F D, sclerotinia white mold (67; see appendix 3).
9 H D, sclerotinia drop (67; see appendix 3).
9 I XXXX
9 J D, early blight, anthracnose, verticillium wilt (67; see appendix 3); stem canker (36). I, Colorado potato beetle (see table 3.5).
9 K D, verticillium wilt (67; see appendix 3). I, Colorado potato beetle (see table 3.5).
9 M D, any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20). S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, preceding and following root crops with “soil building” crops is often desirable (80). W-, due to cultivation and competitiveness, potato cleans up weeds prior to carrots, which are a poor competitor and hard to weed (83).
9 N D, any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20). S-, potatoes improve soil structure before small direct-seeded crops due to low traffic (83).
9 O D, any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20).
9 P S-, potatoes improve soil structure before small direct-seeded crops due to low traffic (83).
9 U S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, preceding and following root crops with “soil building” crops is often desirable (80).
9 AA D, scab of beet is caused by several of the Actinomycete species that cause common scab of potato (36).
9 AC D, verticillium wilt (36); brown and black root rot of strawberries can be caused by the same organism as rhizoctonia canker (black scurf) of potato (36).
10 F D, sclerotinia white mold (67; see appendix 3).
10 H D, sclerotinia drop (67; see appendix 3).
10 I D, verticillium wilt, sclerotinia stalk rot, early blight (67; see appendix 3). I, Colorado potato beetle (see table 3.5).
10 J XXXX
10 K D, verticillium wilt (67; see appendix 3), phytophthora crown, and collar rot (31; see appendix 3). I, Colorado potato beetle (see table 3.5).
10 L D, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
10 Q D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
10 R D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
10 S D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
10 T D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
10 U D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
10 V D, phytophthora blight (31; see appendix 3).
10 W D, phytophthora blight (31; see appendix 3).
10 X D, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
10 Y D, phytophthora blight (31; see appendix 3).
10 AC D, verticillium wilt (36); brown and black root rot by Corticium solani (36).
11 I D, verticillium wilt (67; see appendix 3). I, Colorado potato beetle (see table 3.5).
11 J D, verticillium wilt (67; see appendix 3). I, Colorado potato beetle (see table 3.5).
11 K XXXX
11 L D, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
11 V D, phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
11 W D, phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
11 X D, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
11 Y D, phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
12 I D, verticillium wilt (67; see appendix 3).
12 J D, bacterial spot (67; see appendix 3).
12 K D, verticillium wilt (67; see appendix 3); phytophthora crown and collar rot (see appendix 3).
12 L XXXX
12 V D, phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
12 W D, phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
12 X D, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
12 Y D, phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
13 B W, weed control is difficult in carrots and can lead to heavy weed pressure in onions, which is also a difficult-to-weed crop.
13 D S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80).
13 E S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80).
13 F D, sclerotinia white mold (67; see appendix 3).
13 H D, sclerotinia drop (67; see appendix 3).
13 I D, sclerotinia stalk rot, common scab (67; see appendix 3); any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20). S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, preceding and following root crops with “soil building” crops is often desirable (80).
13 M XXXX
13 N D, any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20).
13 O D, any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20).
13 U S, root crops tend to reduce soil structure due to the additional soil disturbance during harvest; consequently, growing “soil building” crops before and after a root crop is often desirable (80).
13 V D, Cucumber can be infected with canker from soil containing diseased remains of carrots or turnips (36).
13 AN W-,S-, a spring oat cover crop (often with field pea) helps control weeds and restore soil structure after late-harvested root crops like parsnip.
13 AW W-,N-, a spring-planted field pea cover crop (often with oat) controls weeds and helps restore N after late-harvested root crops like parsnip.
14 I D, any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20).
14 M D, any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20).
14 N XXXX
14 O D, celery root rot and celeriac scab are caused by the same organism (Phoma apiicola); once a crop has shown infection, neither crop should be grown for 3–4+ years (36); any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20).
15 I D, any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20).
15 M D, any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20).
15 N D, celery root rot and celeriac scab are caused by the same organism (Phoma apiicola); once a crop has shown infection, neither crop should be grown for 3–4+ years (36); any 2-year sequence involving carrot, celery, and potato should be avoided due to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (20).
15 O XXXX
16 J D, lettuce, cabbage, and cress can be symptomless carriers of Colletotrichum coccodes, which causes tomato anthracnose and black dot (chapter 3). C-, short-season salad greens act as a cover crop and are harvested in time to plant tomato, eggplant, or pepper (83).
16 K C-, short-season salad greens act as a cover crop and are harvested in time to plant tomato, eggplant, or pepper (83).
16 L C-, short-season salad greens act as a cover crop and are harvested in time to plant tomato, eggplant, or pepper (83).
16 P XXXX
16 Q D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
16 R D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
16 S D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
16 T D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
16 U D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
16 V N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).C-, leafy greens can make a crop before cucurbits need to be planted, and residue from the greens act as a green manure (81).
16 W N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83). C-, leafy greens can make a crop before cucurbits need to be planted, and residue from the greens act as a green manure (81).
16 X N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83). C-, leafy greens can make a crop before cucurbits need to be planted, and residue from the greens act as a green manure (81).
16 Y N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83). C-, leafy greens can make a crop before cucurbits need to be planted, and residue from the greens act as a green manure (81).
16 AY D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
16 AZ D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
17 F D, sclerotinia white mold (67; see appendix 3).
17 H D, sclerotinia drop (67; see appendix 3).
17 I D, sclerotinia stalk rot (67; see appendix 3).
17 P D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
17 Q XXXX
17 R D, clubroot, fusarium yellows, blackleaf, black rot, white mold (67).
17 S D, clubroot, fusarium yellows, blackleaf, black rot, white mold (67).
17 T D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
17 U D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
17 V N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
17 W N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
17 X N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
17 Y N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).C-, two rows of broccoli fit comfortably in the space needed for one row of summer squash.
17 AC D-, broccoli residue reduces the severity of verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae) in subsequent strawberry (106).
17 AY D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
17 AZ D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
18 F D, sclerotinia white mold (67; see appendix 3).
18 G D-, residues of crops in the mustard family suppress aphanomyces root rot of pea (85).
18 H D, sclerotinia drop (67; see appendix 3).
18 I D, sclerotinia stalk rot (67; see appendix 3); black scurf and stem canker (Corticum solani) (36).
18 J D, lettuce, cabbage, and cress can be symptomless carriers of Colletotrichum coccodes, which causes tomato anthracnose and black dot (chapter 3).
18 P D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola. and many weeds (36).
18 Q D, clubroot, fusarium yellows, blackleaf, black rot, white mold (67).
18 R XXXX
18 S D, clubroot, fusarium yellows, blackleaf, black rot, white mold (67).
18 T D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
18 U D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
18 V N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
18 W N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
18 X N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
18 Y N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
18 AA D, beet cyst nematode attacks both cabbage and beet (10).
18 AY D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
18 AZ D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
19 F D, sclerotinia white mold (67; see appendix 3).
19 G D-, residues of crops in the mustard family suppress aphanomyces root rot of pea (85).
19 H D, sclerotinia drop (67; see appendix 3).
19 I D, sclerotinia stalk rot (67; see appendix 3).
19 P D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
19 Q D, clubroot, fusarium yellows, blackleaf, black rot, white mold (67).
19 R D, clubroot, fusarium yellows, blackleaf, black rot, white mold (67).
19 S XXXX
19 T D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
19 U D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
19 V N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
19 W N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
19 X N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
19 Y N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
19 AY D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
19 AZ D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
20 G D-, residues of crops in the mustard family suppress aphanomyces root rot of pea (85).
20 I D, common scab (67; see appendix 3).
20 P D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
20 Q D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
20 R D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
20 S D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
20 T XXXX
20 U D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
20 V N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
20 W N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
20 X N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
20 Y N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
20 AY D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
20 AZ D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
21 G D-, residues of crops in the mustard family suppress aphanomyces root rot of pea (85).
21 I D, common scab (67; see appendix 3).
21 P D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
21 Q D, clubroot, blackleaf, blackrot (67; see appendix 3).
21 R D, clubroot, blackleaf, blackrot (67; see appendix 3).
21 S D, clubroot, blackleaf, blackrot (67; see appendix 3).
21 T D, clubroot (67; see appendix 3).
21 U XXXX
21 V D, Cucumber can be infected with canker from soil containing diseased remains of carrots or turnips (36). N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
21 W N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
21 X N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
21 Y N-, brassicas can follow cucurbits within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
21 AY D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
21 AZ D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
22 A W-, mulched vine crops clean up weeds before hard-to- weed crops (83).
22 F W-, intense cultivation of bean can help clean up weeds following a weedy vine crop (83).
22 H W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83).
22 K D, phytophthora crown and collar rot (see appendix 3).
22 L D, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
22 M W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83).
22 P W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83). N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
22 Q D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3). N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
22 R D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3). N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
22 S D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3). N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
22 T D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
22 U D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3). 
22 V XXXX
22 W D, leaf spots, black rot (gummy stem blight), scab (67; see appendix 3); phytophthora blight (see appendix 3)
22 X D, blackrot (gummy stem blight), fusarium crown and fruit rot, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
22 Y D, phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
22 AB I, corn rootworm adults are attracted to cucurbits; they lay their eggs at the base of the plants, and the larvae attack corn roots the following year (see table 3.5).
22 AD I, corn rootworm adults are attracted to cucurbits; they lay their eggs at the base of the plants, and the larvae attack corn roots the following year (see table 3.5).
22 AJ W-, intense cultivation of bean can help clean up weeds following a weedy vine crop (83).
23 A W-, mulched vine crops clean up weeds before hard-to-weed crops (83).
23 F W-, intense cultivation of bean can help clean up weeds following a weedy vine crop (83).
23 H W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83).
23 K D, phytophthora crown and collar rot (see appendix 3).
23 L D, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
23 M W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83).
23 P W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83). N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
23 Q N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
23 R N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
23 S N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
23 V D, leaf spots, gummy stem blight, scab (67; see appendix 3); phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
23 W XXXX
23 X D, blackrot (gummy stem blight), fusarium crown and fruit rot, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
23 Y D, phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
23 AB I, corn rootworm adults are attracted to cucurbits; they lay their eggs at the base of the plants, and the larvae attack corn roots the following year (see table 3.5).
23 AD I, corn rootworm adults are attracted to cucurbits; they lay their eggs at the base of the plants, and the larvae attack corn roots the following year (see table 3.5).
23 AJ W-, intense cultivation of bean can help clean up weeds following a weedy vine crop (83).
24 A W-, mulched vine crops clean up weeds before hard-to-weed crops (83).
24 F W-, intense cultivation of bean can help clean up weeds following a weedy vine crop (83).
24 H W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83).
24 K D, phytophthora crown and collar rot (see appendix 3).
24 L D, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
24 M W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83).
24 P W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83). N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
24 Q N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
24 R N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
24 S N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
24 V D, black rot (gummy stem blight) (67; see appendix 3); phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
24 W D, leaf spots, black rot (gummy stem blight), scab (67; see appendix 3); phytophthora blight (see appendix 3)
24 X XXXX
24 Y D, phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
24 AB I, corn rootworm adults are attracted to cucurbits; they lay their eggs at the base of the plants, and the larvae attack corn roots the following year (see table 3.5).
24 AD I, corn rootworm adults are attracted to cucurbits; they lay their eggs at the base of the plants, and the larvae attack corn roots the following year (see table 3.5).
24 AJ W-, intense cultivation of bean can help clean up weeds following a weedy vine crop (83).
24 AV C-, hairy vetch can be overseeded into winter squash in July to provide a winter cover crop after harvest (83).
25 A W-, mulched vine crops clean up weeds before hard-to- weed crops (83).
25 H W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83).
25 K D, phytophthora crown and collar rot (see appendix 3).
25 L D, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
25 M W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83).
25 P W, unmulched vine crops get weedy; therefore, do not follow them with direct-seeded salad greens or carrots (83). N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
25 Q N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
25 R N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
25 S N-, brassicas can follow vine crops within the same year and vice versa without need for additional compost (83).
25 V D, phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
25 W D,leaf spots, black rot (gummy stem blight), scab (67; see appendix 3); phytophthora blight (see appendix 3).
25 X D, blackrot (gummy stem blight), fusarium crown and fruit rot, phytophthora blight (67; see appendix 3).
25 Y XXXX
25 AB I, corn rootworm adults are attracted to cucurbits; they lay their eggs at the base of the plants, and the larvae attack corn roots the following year (see table 3.5).
25 AD I, corn rootworm adults are attracted to cucurbits; they lay their eggs at the base of the plants, and the larvae attack corn roots the following year (see table 3.5).
26 B W-, a short-season crop like lettuce or spinach allows good weed control and low weed seed production prior to slow-growing, long-season, hard-to-weed crops like onion and carrot (83).
26 D W-, a short-season crop like lettuce or spinach allows good weed control and low weed seed production prior to slow-growing, long-season, hard-to-weed crops like onion and carrot (83).
26 H C-, timing works well to plant lettuce or radish after pea or spinach within a year (82).
26 M W-, a short-season crop like lettuce or spinach allows good weed control and low weed seed production prior to slow-growing, long-season, hard-to-weed crops like onion and carrot (83).
26 T C-, timing works well to plant lettuce or radish after pea or spinach within a year (82).
26 Z XXXX
27 I D, scab of beet is caused by several of the Actinomycete species that cause common scab of potato (36).
27 Q D, beet cyst nematode attacks both cabbage and beet (10), and thus presumably also broccoli and cauliflower.
27 R D, beet cyst nematode attacks both cabbage and beet (10).
27 S D, beet cyst nematode attacks both cabbage and beet (10), and thus presumably also kale and collards.
27 AA XXXX
28 F D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
28 I C-, potato works well after corn because it tolerates corn stover (82).
28 Q D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
28 R D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
28 S D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
28 X D, fusarium fruit rot is more common on pumpkin following corn (chapter 3).
28 AA D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beet to decrease root rots (67).
28 AB XXXX
28 AD I, corn rootworm (see table 3.5).
28 AE D, scab (Gibberella zeae) on barley and spring wheat tends to be worse following corn even than following another spring grain, unless the corn stalks are removed for silage or by clean tillage (10).
28 AG D, fusarium can be a problem when wheat follows corn (83).
28 AJ D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
29 I D, verticillium wilt (36).
29 J D, verticillium wilt (36).
29 K D, verticillium wilt (67; see appendix 3).
29 AC XXXX
30 F D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
30 I C-, potato works well after corn because it tolerates corn stover (82).
30 Q D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
30 R D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
30 S D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
30 X D, fusarium fruit rot is more common on pumpkin following corn (chapter 3).
30 AA D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beet to decrease root rots (67).
30 AB I, corn rootworm (see table 3.5).
30 AD XXXX
30 AE D, scab (Gibberella zeae) on barley and spring wheat tends to be worse following corn even than following another spring grain, unless the corn stalks are removed for silage or by clean tillage (10).
30 AF D, barley should not be grown after corn due to possibility of scab (119).
30 AG D, scab (Fusarium spp. and Gibberella spp.) can be a problem when wheat follows corn (83, 20). D-, foot rot is negligible when wheat follows oat, corn, or beans (20); take-all is better suppressed by corn than by other crops like soybean and sunflower (65).
30 AJ D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
31 A D-,small grains decrease nematode populations (chapter 3). W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell).
31 B W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
31 C W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
31 D W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
31 F D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
31 H D-, rotation with small grains decreases root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) effects on lettuce (22).
31 I D-, use of 2 years of grass or 1 year of cereal in rotation with potato helps reduce rhizoctonia canker (67). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
31 M W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
31 N W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell).
31 Q D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
31 R D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
31 S D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
31 V I, wireworms ((Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
31 W I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
31 AA D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beet to decrease root rots (67). I, wireworms ((Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
31 AB I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
31 AD I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
31 AE XXXX
31 AG D, incidence of foot rot of wheat caused by Fusarium culmorum (but not by Helminthosporium sativum) declines more slowly if oat is part of the rotation (56). D-, foot rot is negligible when wheat follows oat, corn, or bean (20). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
31 AH I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
31 AJ D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
32 A D-, small grains decrease nematode populations (chapter 3). W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell).
32 B W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
32 C W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
32 D W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
32 F D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
32 G D-, a preceding oat crop reduces aphanomyces (common) root rot (Aphanomyces euteiches) (54).
32 H D-, rotation with small grains decreases root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) effects on lettuce (22).
32 I D-, use of 2 years of grass or 1 year of cereal in rotation with potato helps reduce rhizoctonia canker (67). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
32 M W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult to cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
32 N W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult to cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell).
32 Q D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
32 R D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
32 S D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
32 V I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
32 W I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
32 AA D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beet to decrease root rots (67). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
32 AB I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
32 AD I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
32 AF XXXX
32 AG D,barley is a good host for take-all, even though it is less affected by the disease than wheat (52); foot rot is highest when following barley (20). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
32 AH D, barley is a host for ergot (119). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
32 AJ D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
33 A D-, small grains decrease nematode populations (chapter 3).
33 B W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
33 C W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
33 D W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
33 F D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
33 H D-, rotation with small grains decreases root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) effects on lettuce (22).
33 I D-, use of 2 years of grass or 1 year of cereal in rotation with potato helps reduce rhizoctonia canker (67). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
33 M W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
33 N W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell).
33 Q D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
33 R D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
33 S D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
33 V I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
33 W I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
33 AA D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beet to decrease root rots (67). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
33 AB I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
33 AD D, seedling root rots of corn are more common following wheat than following oat (20). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
33 AE I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
33 AF D, To avoid leaf diseases, avoid planting barley after wheat (107); barley should not be planted after wheat due to leaf diseases and root rot (119).
33 AG XXXX
33 AH D, wheat is a host for ergot (119). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
33 AJ D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
34 A D-, small grains decrease nematode populations (chapter 3).
34 B W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
34 C W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
34 D W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell). I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
34 F D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beans to decrease root rots (67).
34 H D-, rotation with small grains decreases root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) effects on lettuce (22).
34 I D-, use of 2 years of grass or 1 year of cereal in rotation with potato helps reduce rhizoctonia canker (67). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
34 M W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell).I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
34 N W, broadleaf weeds have time to set seeds in a grain crop before harvest, which is particularly a problem in noncompetitive or difficult-to-cultivate crops like onion and carrot (39, based on experience of Eric and Anne Nordell).
34 Q D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
34 R D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
34 S D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
34 V I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
34 W I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
34 AA D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beet to decrease root rots (67). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
34 AB I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
34 AD I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
34 AE I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
34 AH XXXX
34 AJ D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
34 AL D, avoid planting crops that are hosts to ergot, such as forage grasses, before and after rye in the rotation (119).
35 F D, common bacterial blight (Xanthomonas campestris; appendix 3); soybean cyst nematode (28).
35 I D-, soybean before potato prevents scab (82).
35 AD D-, a previous crop of soybean reduces red root rot of corn (Phoma terrestris + Pythium spp. and Fusarium spp.) (123).
35 AI XXXX
35 AJ D, common bacterial blight (Xanthomonas campestris; appendix 3); soybean cyst nematode (28).
35 AY D, following soybean with rape or canola fosters buildup of Sclerotinia (119).
36 F D, common bacterial blight (appendix 3); soybean cyst nematode (28).
36 H D, sclerotinia drop (67; see appendix 3).
36 I D, sclerotinia stalk rot (67; see appendix 3).
36 AG D-, foot rot is negligible when wheat follows oat, corn, or beans (20).
36 AI D, common bacterial blight (Xanthomonas campestris; appendix 3); soybean cyst nematode increases to high density on bean, though the bean crop is scarcely affected (28, 41).
36 AJ XXXX
36 AW D, field pea and bell bean should not be planted after bean due to FusariumPythium, and Sclerotinia (119).
36 AX D, field pea and bell bean should not be planted after bean due to Fusarium, Pythium, and Sclerotinia (119).
37 I D-, alfalfa decreases fusarium wilt (20).
37 M D, carrot root dieback can be severe after alfalfa; alfalfa is a host for Pythium violae, which causes cavity spot (see chapter 3).
37 AJ N-, S-, dry beans do well after sod crops due to good tilth and nutrition (83).
37 AK XXXX
37 AW D, field pea and bell bean should not be planted after alfalfa due to Fusarium and Pythium (119).
37 AX D, field pea and bell bean should not be planted after alfalfa due to Fusarium and Pythium (119).
38 B I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
38 C I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
38 D I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
38 I D-, green manure of rye or other grass reduces common scab and black scurf (rhizoctonia canker) (36); also, use of 2 years of grass or 1 year of cereal in rotation with potato helps reduce rhizoctonia canker (67).
38 M W, perennial grasses and weeds from plowed-down sod make weeding carrots difficult (82). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
38 V I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
38 W I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
38 AA I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
38 AB D-, N-,corn does well after sod; it is a heavy feeder and can use the high N available, and diseases are not a problem (82). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) and white grubs (Phyllophaga spp.) (see table 3.5).
38 AC I,white grubs (Phyllophaga spp.) (see table 3.5).
38 AD D-, N-,corn does well after sod; it is a heavy feeder and can use the high N available, and diseases are not a problem (82). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) and white grubs (Phyllophaga spp.) (see table 3.5).
38 AE D, “If scald is a problem, barley should not be grown after bromegrass” (119).I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) (see table 3.5).
38 AG D, smooth brome should not be used in rotation with wheat if take-all is a problem (52). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) and white grubs (Phyllophaga spp.) (see table 3.5).
38 AH D, avoid planting crops that are hosts to ergot, such as forage grasses, before and after rye in the rotation (119). I, wireworms (Melanotus communis and Limonius spp.) and white grubs (Phyllophaga spp.) (see table 3.5).
38 AJ N-,S-, dry beans do well after sod crops due to good tilth and nutrition (83).
38 AL XXXX
38 AM C-, rye and hairy vetch establish well in plowed sod and make a good transition from grass sod to vegetables (81).
38 AV C-, rye and hairy vetch establish well in plowed sod and make a good transition from grass sod to vegetables (81).
39 A W-, C, decomposing rye releases allelopathic toxins that suppress weeds but may also harm crops. Problems can be avoided by incorporating residue 3 weeks before planting (95). I-, “High-biomass cover crops such as barley or rye increased population of centipedes, predator mites and other important predators” (107). N, incorporation of large amounts of grain straw can tie up nitrogen in microbial tissues, thereby making it unavailable to succeeding crops. S, the lag between incorporation and planting, however, leaves the soil open to erosion. C-, for maximum dry matter accumulation, use before late spring or early summer crops (81).
39 B I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain precedes onions (82, 83).
39 C I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain precedes onions (82, 83).
39 D I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
39 F D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beans to decrease root rots (67).
39 G D-, rye suppresses thielaviopsis (black) root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola) (54).
39 H C, avoid direct seeding of small-seeded crops after a rye cover crop due to interference from the straw (82).
39 I D-, green manure of rye or other grass reduces common scab and black scurf (rhizoctonia canker) (20, 36).
39 M C, avoid direct seeding small-seeded crops after a rye cover crop due to interference from the straw (82).
39 N C, avoid direct seeding small-seeded crops after a rye cover crop due to interference from the straw (82).
39 P C, avoid direct seeding small-seeded crops after a rye cover crop due to interference from the straw (82).
39 Q D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
39 R D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
39 S D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67).
39 AA D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beet to decrease root rots (67).
39 AF D, to avoid leaf diseases, avoid planting barley after wheat (107).
39 AJ D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
39 AM XXXX
40 A D-, unlike most crops, an oat cover crop decreases density of lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.) (41). I-, “High-biomass cover crops such as barley or rye increased population of centipedes, predator mites, and other important predators” (107). N, incorporating annual ryegrass can tie up N in microbial tissues, thereby making it unavailable to succeeding crops. Problems can be avoided by incorporating residue a few weeks before planting (107). S, the lag between incorporation and planting, however, leaves the soil open to erosion. C-, “Winter killed cover crops like field pea and oats made the most sense before early planted vegetables, allowing us to work the ground early in the spring” (39, quoting Eric and Anne Nordell).
40 B I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
40 C I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
40 D I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
40 F D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with bean to decrease root rots (67).
40 I D-, use of 2 years of grass or 1 year of cereal in rotation with potato helps reduce rhizoctonia canker (67).
40 Q D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67). W-, S-, oat cover crop (often with field pea) controls weeds and improves soil structure before summer-transplanted brassicas (83).
40 R D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67). W-, S-, oat cover crop (often with field pea) controls weeds and improves soil structure before summer-transplanted brassicas (83).
40 S D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with cabbage and related species to decrease white mold (67). W-, S-, oat cover crop (often with field pea) controls weeds and improves soil structure before summer-transplanted brassicas (83).
40 AA D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beet to decrease root rots (67).
40 AJ D-, use grain crops or sweet corn in rotation with beans to decrease root rots (67).
40 AN XXXX
41 A N, incorporating annual ryegrass can tie up N in microbial tissues, thereby making it unavailable to succeeding crops. Problems can be avoided by incorporating residue a few weeks before planting (107). S, the lag between incorporation and planting, however, leaves the soil open to erosion.
41 B I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
41 C I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
41 D I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
41 I D-, use of 2 years of grass or 1 year of cereal in rotation with potato helps reduce rhizoctonia canker (67).
41 P D-, ryegrass reduces clubroot infection rates more than other rotation species (20).
41 Q D-, ryegrass reduces clubroot infection rates more than other rotation species (20).
41 R D-, ryegrass reduces clubroot infection rates more than other rotation species (20).
41 S D-, ryegrass reduces clubroot infection rates more than other rotation species (20).
41 T D-, ryegrass reduces clubroot infection rates more than other rotation species (20).
41 U D-, ryegrass reduces clubroot infection rates more than other rotation species (20).
41 AO XXXX
42 A D-, sorghum-sudangrass cover crop reduces southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) populations in subsequent vegetable crops (30).
42 B I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
42 C I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
42 D I, onion thrips may be a problem when grain or any grass precedes onions (83).
42 I D-, use of 2 years of grass or 1 year of cereal in rotation with potato helps reduce rhizoctonia canker (67).
42 AP XXXX
43 I D-, severity of verticillium wilt was lower following buckwheat green manure than following canola or a fallow period (see chapter 3). S-, buckwheat leaves the soil in a good state of tilth for potato (83).
43 Q D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
43 R D-,clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
43 S D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
43 T D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
43 U D-, clubroot declines more quickly when tomato, cucumber, snap bean, or buckwheat is grown (see chapter 3).
43 AQ XXXX
44 A I, “Grubs, wireworms, maggots, and slugs were also a nuisance after even one year of clover sod” (39, quoting Eric and Anne Nordell). N-, nitrogen-fixing cover crop (107).
44 H I, clovers before lettuce increases tarnished plant bug attack (82).
44 AR XXXX
45 A I, “Grubs, wireworms, maggots, and slugs were also a nuisance after even one year of clover sod” (39, quoting Eric and Anne Nordell).N-, nitrogen-fixing cover crop (107).
45 G D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
45 H D, clover rot fungus (Sclerotinia trifoliorum) occasionally attacks lettuce (36).I, clover before lettuce increases tarnished plant bug attack (82).
45 P C-, fall-sown red clover provides a drought-tolerant cover crop the next summer prior to fall-sown brassicas (83).
45 Q C-, fall-sown red clover provides a drought-tolerant cover crop the next summer prior to fall-sown brassicas (83).
45 S C-, fall-sown red clover provides a drought-tolerant cover crop the next summer prior to fall-sown brassicas (83).
45 AI D, “Never plant dry beans or soybeans after clover unless the cover has been thoroughly incorporated by plowing” (107).
45 AJ D, “Never plant dry beans or soybeans after clover unless the cover has been thoroughly incorporated by plowing” (107).
45 AS XXXX
45 AW D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
45 AX D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
46 A N-, nitrogen-fixing cover crop (107).
46 H I, clover before lettuce increases tarnished plant bug attack (82).
46 AT XXXX
47 A N-, nitrogen-fixing cover crop (107).
47 F D, white sweet clover is an important host in which yellow bean mosaic virus 2 overwinters. It can infect also broad bean (and presumably bell bean), soybean, and alsike and other clovers (36).
47 I D, sweet clover green manure is more conducive to scab development than alfalfa or rye (20).
47 AI D, white sweet clover is an important host in which yellow bean mosaic virus 2 overwinters. It can infect also broad bean (and presumably bell bean), soybean, and alsike and other clovers (36).
47 AM C-, a winter grain can be overseeded into a previously established hairy vetch cover crop to create a mixed grass–legume winter cover (83).
47 AS D, white sweet clover is an important host in which yellow bean mosaic virus 2 overwinters. It can infect also broad bean (and presumably bell bean), soybean, and alsike and other clovers (36).
47 AU XXXX
47 AX D, white sweet clover is an important host in which yellow bean mosaic virus 2 overwinters. It can infect also broad bean (and presumably bell bean), soybean, and alsike and other clovers (36).
48 A D, hairy vetch is a good host for northern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla) (113). N-, nitrogen-fixing cover crop (107).C-, use of hairy vetch (often with rye) before late-planted crops allows maximum accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen (81).
48 G D, avoid hairy vetch in rotation with pea due to black stem fungus (Ascochyta pinodella) (20).
48 V N-, cucurbits have a high nitrogen need that vetch can supply (83).
48 W D-, hairy vetch residue incorporated into the soil reduces fusarium wilt in watermelon. N-, cucurbits have a high nitrogen need that vetch can supply (83).
48 X N-, cucurbits have a high nitrogen need that vetch can supply (83).
48 Y N-, cucurbits have a high nitrogen need that vetch can supply (83).
48 AM W, hairy vetch can be a severe weed in all winter grains, decreasing both yield and quality. Dormant seeds in the cover-crop sowing may persist in the soil for several years and infest subsequent winter grain crops even if the cover crop is not allowed to seed (59).
48 AV XXXX
49 A N-, nitrogen-fixing cover crop (107).C-, “Winter killed cover crops like field pea and oats made the most sense before early planted vegetables, allowing us to work the ground early in the spring” (39, quoting Eric and Anne Nordell).
49 G D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
49 H D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
49 Q N-,W-, a field pea cover crop (often with oat) controls weeds and provides nitrogen for summer-transplanted brassicas (83).
49 R N-,W-, a field pea cover crop (often with oat) controls weeds and provides nitrogen for summer-transplanted brassicas (83).
49 S N-,W-, a field pea cover crop (often with oat) controls weeds and provides nitrogen for summer-transplanted brassicas (83).
49 AS D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
49 AW XXXX
49 AX D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
50 A N-, nitrogen-fixing cover crop.
50 G D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
50 H D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
50 P N-, brassicas do well after incorporating bell bean due to abundant N supply (83).
50 Q N-, brassicas do well after incorporating bell bean due to abundant N supply (83).
50 R N-, brassicas do well after incorporating bell beans due to abundant N supply (83).
50 S N-, brassicas do well after incorporating bell bean due to abundant N supply (83).
50 T N-, brassicas do well after incorporating bell bean due to abundant N supply (83).
50 U N-, brassicas do well after incorporating bell bean due to abundant N supply (83).
50 AS D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
50 AW D, sclerotinia disease of broad bean (presumably including bell bean) and red clover rot are closely related (varieties of S. trifoliorum); each can attack a variety of crops, including pea, lettuce, and possibly other plants (36).
50 AX XXXX
51 A D-, incorporated mustard family cover crops suppress a variety of soilborne diseases (see chapter 3).
51 I D-, plowed-down brassica cover crops act as a fumigant against potato diseases (83).
51 P D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
51 Q D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
51 R D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
51 S D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
51 T D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
51 U D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
51 AY XXXX
51 AZ D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
52 A D-, incorporated mustard family cover crops suppress a variety of soilborne diseases (see chapter 3).
52 I D-, plowed-down brassica cover crops act as a fumigant against potato diseases (83).
52 P D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
52 Q D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
52 R D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
52 S D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
52 T D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
52 U D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
52 AI D-, oilseed radish can decrease nematode populations in soybean (119).
52 AY D, clubroot attacks many crops in the mustard family, including cabbage and its relatives, mustard, radish, Chinese cabbage, turnip, canola, and many weeds (36).
52 AZ XXXX

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