Integrated Systems

Integrated Systems

Integrated Systems

A Range Management Curriculum and Participatory Planning Project for the Tohono O’odham Nation

SW02-051, Maria Fernandez-Gimenez, Arizona

Type: Western SARE Project Summary

Agripreneur Training Program Materials

Type: North Central SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

Materials developed to train Latino immigrants interested in starting a free-range poultry business. Incluye el currículo en español.

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Alternative Pollinators

Type: North Central SARE Portfolio Brief Sheet

Honeybee losses, compounded with rising rental rates for pollination, are a concern for many producers. Not only are growers looking for alternative pollinators to improve crop security, but they also want to learn how to manage on-farm habitats for native bees and other pollinators. Since 1988, NCR-SARE has supported researchers, educators, and producers who are researching, rearing, and managing species that provide pollination alternatives to the declining honey bee.

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Aquaponics in the Classroom

Using Aquaponics to Teach Core Science Concepts

Type: From the Field Profile

Students at Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy are being exposed to their core science concepts in a new way. They are learning biology, chemistry, physics, and other core scientific concepts through hands-on modules based on an aquaponics system.

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Assessing Sustainability of Shrimp Aquaculture and Integration with a Field Crop

SW01-062, Kevin Fitzsimmons, Arizona

Type: Western SARE Project Summary

Common NRCS Practices Related to Pest Management on Organic Farms

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

This document demonstrates how certain NRCS practices that have primary resource protection benefits can also have significant Integrated Pest Management benefits to organic producers.

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Conservation Buffers in Organic Systems

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

Conservation Buffers provides guidance on installing buffers in organic production systems to meet the USDA National Organic Program NOP regulations.

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Conservation Buffers in Organic Systems: California

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

Conservation Buffers provides guidance on installing buffers in organic production systems to meet the USDA National Organic Program NOP regulations.

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Conservation Buffers in Organic Systems: Idaho

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

Conservation Buffers provides guidance on installing buffers in organic production systems to meet the USDA National Organic Program NOP regulations.

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Conservation Buffers in Organic Systems: Nevada

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

Conservation Buffers provides guidance on installing buffers in organic production systems to meet the USDA National Organic Program NOP regulations.

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Conservation Buffers in Organic Systems: Oregon

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

Conservation Buffers provides guidance on installing buffers in organic production systems to meet the USDA National Organic Program NOP regulations.

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Cover Crop Cocktail

Workshops Train Educators on Ecosystem Services

Type: From the Field Profile

Ecosystem services are the ways in which people benefit from wildlife and/or ecosystems. Cover crops can slow soil erosion, improve soil health, smother weeds, enhance nutrient and moisture availability, help control pests, and bring a host of ecosystem services.  They have become an important part of organic cropping systems, but Rafiq Islam feels that many people still do not realize their full benefit.

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Crop Rotation

Type: North Central SARE Portfolio Brief Sheet

Crop rotation is the ancient practice of growing a wide variety of crops in a sequential system throughout a field in order to avoid a buildup of disease and pests. Strategic crop rotations can help producers promote good soil health by alternating crops with different nutrient needs and benefit overall soil structure by breaking up subsoil by alternating deep and shallow rooting plants. NCR-SARE has valued research and education projects that study the applications of crop rotation-including improving soil quality and health, and managing pest, diseases, and weeds.

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Ecosystem Services in Hedgerow Restorations: Pollination Function and Nesting Habitat

Type: Western SARE From the Field Profile

Due to declines in honey bee populations, and drops in native bee numbers in some regions, there is increasing interest in on-farm practices that restore habitat-supporting pollination services. Hedgerows – field edge plantings of native shrubs and forbs – are commonly used to re-diversify agricultural areas as a means to strengthen ecosystem benefits.More knowledge about the efficacy of hedgerow restoration in providing availability of nesting resources, translating into more nesting bees, is essential.

Evaluation of Supplemental Flowering Plant Strips for Sustainable Enhancement of Beneficial Insects

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

The primary short-term goal of this graduate student grant project was to test a strategy for utilization of  native plants to increase biodiversity in a perennial fruit system. This project is of particular relevance to specialty crop farmers that are under pressure to reduce pesticide inputs while also producing the highest quality food. 

Experimental Farm Helps North Carolina Farmers

Type: Southern SARE From the Field Profile

The Center for Environmental Farming Systems has produced a wealth of valuable data through its farm systems research units.

Facilitating Integrated Weed Management in California Rice: Predicting E. spp. and C. difformis Emergence Across Heterogeneous Growing Environments

Type: Western SARE From the Field Profile

California rice growers face increasing problems with herbicide-resistant weeds in their fields. Previous research projects focused on ecologically-based integrated weed management approaches in a variety of cropping systems, but none focused on rice systems. In addition, previous projects included spatial modeling components or the creation of decision support tools, but, again, none included specific information on rice.

Farmer Incorporates Movable Coops for Multiple Benefits

Hoeing Hens

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

Wil Farm, owned by Pieter Los, consists of 18 acres near Hermann, Missouri — approximately 2 acres are used to raise flowers, produce, strawberries, and laying hens.

Los incorporated movable coops for laying hens into this sustainable farming system to reduce weeds, tillage, and nutrient losses, and to increase income soil fertility, and farm diversity.

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Farmers Study Multiple Benefits of Chickens and High Tunnels

Examining the Practicality of Incorporating Chickens into a Diversified High Tunnel Rotation System

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

The Neff Family Farm is on 13 acres, 10 tilled. The Neffs grow vegetables and herbs on old wheat ground. The soil was damaged and not very productive. Poultry has been part of the operation for a long time but the birds had not been incorporated into the rest of the farm in a sustainable manner.

The Neffs created six study plots, each measuring 20 ft. x 24 ft., and implemented a two-year rotation that included various combinations of herbs, vegetables, strawberries, chickens, and fallow.They wanted to explore if integrating chickens into a chemical-free high tunnel system would reduce fuel costs, as well as improve soil fertility and help control insects.

Farming for Pollinators

New American Farm Conference Breakout Session

Type: Presentation

With honey bees threatened, researchers are looking for long-term solutions. Hear the latest research and learn how to encourage a diverse array of pollinators by planting native species, reducing pesticide use, arranging crops and borders, and other “farmscaping” techniques.

For Vegetable Farmers, a New No-Till Tool in Forage Radish

Type: Northeast SARE From the Field Profile

University of Maryland researchers are exploring the benefits of forage radish, a relatively new cover crop species that they have found fits well with no-till spring planting for organic farmers, boosting yields and profits.

Four Corners Navajo Nation Sustainable Agriculture Demonstration Project

SW93-034, Lyle McNeal, Utah

Type: Western SARE Project Summary

Habitat Management in Vineyards

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

This manual explores practical steps to restore agricultural biodiversity at the field and landscape level, thus breaking the monoculture nature of vineyards and  reducing their ecological vulnerability. The most obvious advantage of diversification is a reduced risk of crop failure due to invasions by unwanted species and  subsequent pest infestations. The manual focuses on ways in which increased plant biodiversity can contribute to stabilizing pest population by creating an appropriate ecological infrastructure within and around vineyards.

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Illinois Researchers Explore Use of Sorghum-Sudangrass In the Battle Against Weeds

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

Researchers at the University of Illinois are using sorghum-sudangrass as a summer smother crop in the battle against aggressive perennial weeds.

Integrated Pest Management

Type: North Central SARE Portfolio Brief Sheet

While every farming system is unique, the principles of integrated pest management (IPM) apply universally. NCR-SARE has funded more than 100 projects on ecologically based pest management and the strategies of farmers throughout the region who are addressing pest problems. NCR-SARE has invested in pest management strategies to help develop more complex, more diverse ecosystems in the region.

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Integrated Weed Management - One Year's Seeding

Type: North Central SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

Weed biology and ecology can help every farmer become a better weed manager. This guide is the result of a series of winter meetings attended by Michigan farmers, MSU Extension agents and research scientists. It brings together field-tested experience from successful growers and Extension agents and insights distilled from more than 50 years of weed science research.

Integrating Bird Conservation into Range Management

EW02-009,Tammy VerCauteren,Colorado

Type: Western SARE Project Summary

Integrating Conservation Biological Control on Farms: Banking on Beetles in Oregon

FW06-324, Gwendolyn Ellen, Oregon

Type: Western SARE Project Summary

Integrating Traditional Foods with Aquaponics in the Desert Southwest

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

Claudio Rodriguez takes you through the basics of aquaponic growing at Arevalos Farm in McNeal, AZ. Project partially funded by Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education.

Integrating Traditional Foods with Aquaponics in the Desert Southwest

Type: Western SARE From the Field Profile

Farmer Aaron Cardona designed his project to research building a more affordable aquaponic system on his farm, which could be replicated by others in the region, creating an economic opportunity. The system would also produce culturally relevant food as a means of bringing back traditional foods into the local population’s diet; thus, improving the health of the community.

Local Foods

Type: North Central SARE Promotional Product

A growing group of people are interested in getting more local foods into the hands of consumers -- and providing additional marketing channels for farmers to produce sustainable, local foods. “Scaling Up” local food refers to the process of building the system necessary to make local food available to a wider segment of the population than currently possible. NCR-SARE has supported research and education in some of the key challenge areas to scaling up local foods including agricultural production, storage and transportation, and marketing and sales.

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Management Practices and Cover Crops for Reducing Tillage, Enhancing Soil Quality, and Managing Weeds

Type: Western SARE From the Field Profile

When Douglas Collins, Washington State University, brought together a research and producer group, they identified a “lack of successful examples of reduced-till practices for systems similar to theirs and in the maritime Northwest climate” as a critical gap to making this system change. Producers were specifically interested in identifying species of cover crops to use in organic reduced-till systems; planting and termination timing for cover crops; weed management techniques; and field equipment necessary to adopt these systems.” Consequently, Collins and his team developed the project “Selecting Management Practices and Cover Crops for Reducing Tillage, Enhancing Soil Quality, and Managing Weeds in Western Washington” with the long-term goal to increase organic farmer economic and environmental sustainability in western Washington through soil conservation in reduced tillage systems.

Managing Cover Crops Profitably, 3rd Edition

Type: Book

Managing Cover Crops Profitably explores how and why cover crops work and provides all the information needed to build cover crops into any farming operation.

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Michigan Researches Use Flowering Plant Strips to Support Beneficial Insects and Increase Crop Productivity

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

Beneficial insects are valued on farms for their abilities to perform services like pollination and pest control. Researchers at Michigan State University are exploring whether plantings of native Midwest flowers can support beneficial insects and lead to improved crop productivity and quality.

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Michigan State Graduate Student Explores the Benefits of Adding Cover Crops to Vegetable Production

Cereal-Legume Cover Crops

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

Cover crops can help slow erosion, improve soil, smother weeds, enhance nutrient and moisture availability, help control many pests, and bring a host of other benefits to farms across the country. A graduate student at Michigan State University wanted to optimize seeding rates for cereal-legume cover crop mixtures and found tradeoffs in services based on treatment.

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Minnesota Producer Experiments with Hogs to Control Buckthorn

Control of Buckthorn with Hogs, Cutting Feed Costs with Food Waste

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

Originally introduced by European settlers who liked the fast growth and thick hedges it produced, buckthorn is an exotic invasive species that forms an impenetrable understory that can cause long-term decline of woodland and wetland areas by competing with native tree seedlings and plants. Struggling with traditional treatment choices for this noxious weed, Minnesota producer, Nancy Lunzer, tested an original option for controlling buckthorn on her ranch.

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Missouri Farmer Develops Sustainable Irrigation System for Organic Vegetable Production Systems

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

In Ashland, MO, Dan Kuebler is creating an affordable, efficient, and sustainable irrigation system for a two acre organic vegetable operation. Since 1977, Dan Kuebler has been running a certified organic garden operation in Ashland.

Mixed Crop-Livestock Farming Systems for the Inland Northwest U.S.

EW06-066, Lynne Carpenter-Boggs, Washington

Type: Western SARE Project Summary

NOFA Handbooks

Type: Northeast SARE Book

A series of eight handbooks for new farmers or established producers seeking to transition to organic or improve their current practices. Print only; order from Chelsea Green.

North Dakota Farming Family Uses Livestock to Restore the Land

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

A group of farmers in Wimbledon, ND are working to turn a conventional chemically dependent farm into a fertile, sustainable, organic, farming unit. What started as a farm restoration project for the sake of their beef market ended by using all of the livestock to restore the soil.

On-Farm Internship Training Binder

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

The Placer Ag Futures Project was conceived as a response to critical issues affecting local agricultural sustainability. This project was intended to help grow a new crop of agricultural professionals that are trained in sustainable agricultural practices.

One part of the Ag Futures Project was the on-farm internship training. The summer internship program consisted of an intensive three-day pre-internship training, a training binder and a nine-week rotating internship, working with producers of different commodities. The internship started with a three-day training program developed and delivered by producers and University of California Cooperative Extension Farm Advisors. The training included classroom sessions on the science of production and husbandry practices, as well as hands-on practical training at several of the participating operations. To augment the training, each intern received a binder of materials related to production and husbandry practices for the relevant crops and species, farm safety and other information.

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On-Farm Research Investigates How Planting Techniques Influence Livestock Grazing

Skip-Row Corn Planting Techniques with Cover Crops for Sustainable Grazing

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

Harry Cope grazes 100 head of cattle, 400 ewes, and occasionally 400 head of feeder goats. He wanted to switch from supplementing pasture with harvested grains to a year-round grazing system that included standing corn interplanted with cover crops.

Getting good soil contact and enough light are challenges when planting cover crops into a standing corn crop. Skip-row planting (skipping some rows of corn when planting) looked like a solution that would allow Cope to establish a cover crop mix of oats, cereal rye, red clover, Winford turnip kale, Graza radish, and cow peas. If successful, he could extend the length of time his animals could graze forages (cover crops), reduce labor and input costs, and increase profitability.

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Organic Heirloom Tomato Production in High Tunnel and Open Field Systems

Research Innovations

Type: Southern SARE Ag Innovations

A replicated, systems-level comparison study was carried out to evaluate the production of the popular heirloom tomato, Cherokee Purple, under organically managed high tunnel and open field systems.

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Perspectives on Systems Research

Type: Southern SARE Bulletin

Bringing Systems Research Into Focus

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Reducing Pacific Island Growers’ Reliance on Off-island Fertilizer Sources

Type: Western SARE From the Field Profile

At the Western SARE Hawaii sub-regional conference held in 2008, stakeholders identified replacing imported fertilizers with local resources as the highest research, education, and development priority. The cost of commercial fertilizer has risen along with oil prices, and thus, growers in the Pacific region are increasingly interested in obtaining locally available by-products that can be used as agricultural inputs. According to Theodore Radovich, University of Hawaii, possible inputs include commercial green-waste composts, rendered animal products (tankage), and invasive algae from coral reef remediation projects. These by-products are readily available, but bottlenecks exist that inhibit use and adoption by growers. To address the bottlenecks, Radovich developed this project to conduct a series of greenhouse and on-farm trials in cooperation with university faculty, commercial growers, and industry partners.

Research Team Studies Biofuel Cropping System to Increase Crop Profitability

Sustainability of a Short-Rotation Woody Biofuel System Compared to Grass Biofuel and Grain Cropping Systems

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

The North Central region has over 11 million acres of claypan and claypan-like soil areas that are disproportionate sources of nonpoint pollution and soil quality degradation when used for grain production.

Hank Stelzer wanted to determine whether a short-rotation willow biofuel cropping system on claypan soil could improve crop profitability, but establishing a willow crop during the 2011 and 2012 growing seasons on a Centralia, Missouri, research site was especially difficult because of severe drought.

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Resources for Conservation Planning on Organic and Transitioning-to-Organic Operations

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

This document discusses existing tools and resources that support successful conservation planning on organic and transitioning to organic operations.

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SARE Publications Kit

Type: National SARE Promotional Product

Order an entire set of SARE Outreach books and bulletins for one low price.


Print Version:
$125.00

Sheep Grazing - Alfalfa Economic Tool

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

This program was developed from current research for sheep and alfalfa producers as an economic decision and support tool.

Sustainable Agriculture Farming Systems Project

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

A quarterly newsletter and 24-minute video outlining this long-term systems project researching the transition to organic production.

Sustainable Agriculture Symposium

Type: Presentation

Farmers, ranchers and other stakeholders discuss a landmark report on sustainable agricultural systems during a Sept. 16, 2010 symposium co-sponsored by SARE.

Sustainable Landscapes: Investigating the Landscape Scale Effects of Riparian Habitat on Natural Pest Control

Type: Western SARE From the Field Profile

Agriculture can look to landscape diversity that includes riparian habitat to reduce run-off, improve water quality, and attract beneficial predators. However, there is little understanding of the effects of natural areas and landscape diversity on pests and pest predators. As species move between natural and agricultural areas, effects on the food webs in both habitats could occur. This could include changes in natural pests in agriculture. Therefore, how areas surrounding a farm affect the dynamics of natural biological control needs to be better understood.

Systems Research Methods Handbook

Type: Southern SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

A concise, advisory handbook prepared for Southern SARE outlining systems research methods and objectives, with additional resources.

Systems Research in Action

New American Farm Conference Breakout Session

Type: Presentation

In Texas, researchers used systems thinking to find ways to boost productivity, reduce fuel costs and protect declining water supplies in the arid panhandle. In California, researchers have compared the complex ecological and economic consequences of conventional and non-conventional farming systems.

The New American Farmer, 2nd Edition

Profiles of Agricultural Innovation

Type: Book

Hailing from small vegetable farms, cattle ranches and grain farms covering thousands of acres, the producers in The New American Farmer, 2nd edition have embraced new sustainable approaches to agriculture.

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The Ogallala Aquifer of the Texas High Plains: A Race Against Time

The Texas Alliance for Water Conservation

Type: Multimedia

As the drought in the Texas High Plains continues to intensify, a unique partnership of producers and researchers is working diligently to find economically viable alternatives to the region’s irrigation-dependent crop monocultures.

The Small-Scale, Integrated, Self-Sufficient and Sustainable Farm Organism

New American Farm Conference Poster

Type: Poster

The Small-Scale, Integrated, Self-Sufficient and Sustainable Farm Organism, presented by Henning Sehmsdorf.

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The Small-Scale, Integrated, Self-Sufficient and Sustainable Farm Organism

Henning Sehmsdorf, Washington

Type: Western SARE Project Summary

Trained Sheep Grazing Vineyard Floor

Aversion Training

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

According to researchers, training sheep to have a food aversion is a simple process. However, there are important steps to follow to improve the strength of the aversion. This fact sheet describes the aversion training process.

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Trained Sheep Grazing Vineyard Floor

LiCl Dosage

Type: Western SARE Grantee-Produced Info Product

According to researchers, training sheep to have a food aversion is a simple process. However, there are important steps to follow to improve the strength of the aversion. This fact sheet describes how to find the correct dose of LiCl for the aversion training process.

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Transition from Conventional to Low-Input or Organic Farming Systems

SW99-008, Steve Temple, California

Type: Western SARE Project Summary

Truffle Orchard Establishment — The Burgundy Truffle

Phase 1 & 2: Truffle Orchard Establishment - The Burgundy Truffle as a New Sustainable Agroforestry Crop for Missouri

Type: North Central SARE From the Field Profile

Ozark Forest Mushrooms (OFM), owned by Nicola Macpherson Hellmuth, specializes in log-grown shiitake mushrooms, and oyster mushrooms grown on bagged agricultural waste substrate. Additionally, OFM sells imported truffles. Hellmuth viewed growing truffles as an opportunity to introduce an exciting new agroforesty product into an area of high unemployment, and to provide an additional culinary highlight and agrotourism attraction in the region. With SARE support, she has been working to cultivate the European burgundy truffle.

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Western Integrated Ranch/Farm Education (WIRE)

SW96-010, John Hewlett, Wyoming

Type: Western SARE Project Summary

 

From the Field