SARE Cover Crops Webinars

SARE Cover Crops Webinars

SARE Cover Crops Webinars

As part of the Missouri SARE State Program, Debi Kelly hosted two webinars on Cover Crops in fall 2012. Presenters included Charles Ellis, a Natural Resource Engineer with the Lincoln County University of Missouri Extension Center, and Rich Hoormann, an Agronomy Specialist with Montgomery County University of Missouri Extension Center. 

First Webinar: September 4, 2012. Charles Ellis and Rich Hoormann speak about cover crops for drought sites.

Hoorman covers:

  • Least Risk & Expense cover crops for fall 2012
  • Cover crops that offer fall grazing or hay opportunities
  • Cover crop species that offer winter/spring grazing opportunities
  • Cover crop species that scavenge N
  • Cover crop species response to fall applied nutrients

Ellis covers:

  • Broadcasting cover crop equipment and experience
  • Drilling cover crop species into crop residue

Second Webinar: October 24, 2012. Charles Ellis and Rich Hoormann speak about cover crop demonstration results from work they have been doing with 2 local farmers.

Hoorman covers:

  • Laddonia Plots: Corn plant growth & development response to cover crops with yield information
  • Results of 2012 spring root dig with backhoe by species
  • Results of soil penetrometer readings by species

Ellis covers:

  • Results of green seeker readings on corn by cover crop species
  • Nitrate recommendation results by cover crop species
  • Above ground biomass by cover crop as estimated by green seeker technology
Product specs
Format: Webinars
Year: 2012
Location: Missouri | North Central
How to order

Only available online

Visit the website: Cover Crops Webinar

This material is based upon work that is supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture through the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.